Tag: sponsorship

bring it on, rio.

The Olympics season is upon us and although Team GB have just started to bag the ultimate prize, Adworld didn’t fail to unload the usual stack of commercials from our favourite sponsors, ambushers and opportunists alike. You could be forgiven to think it will be hard to find great work this year. After all, a brief that has both the words Olympics and Rio in it doesn’t give much space to creative ingenuity. A maxi quadrennial year also means investments had to be prioritised between the Euros, the Olympics and, of course, Zlatan already being a living god in the Premierleague.

I’ll start with one that rarely disappoint – the swoosh. After the Make it Count campaign, our friends from Portland did it again, this time with Unlimited You, their latest positioning building on their tagline (which they shatter in the spot). A clip that is as inclusive (genders and sports alike) as the Olympics are meant to be, and one that still has that edge of personality they’ve recently introduced in their work. Start with the teaser and see it for yourself.

But it wasn’t about personality for everyone, as most broadcasters thought it would be tears of joy that would drive us to the aisles. That was the case for P&G who continued their Thank You Mum franchise ; Always who brought an Olympics twist to #likeagirl ; and Dick’s who gave us a lesson in biology and human nature with Gold in US.

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The greatest show on Earth is also the occasion to offer world-class storytelling, celebrating those athletes and their inspiring stories. Gillette tells us what happens behind the scenes of an athlete’s life in Perfect isn’t Pretty (although I find the link to the brand quite disappointing), Powerade went for the story of a kid overcoming obstacles in his personal life to make it to the big stage with a new instalment of Just a Kid. But one story that was worth telling this year was the one of the first ever Refugees team, the Olympics being the perfect playground for them to prove the world they’re more than what people think. Obviously a powerful story will attract lots of opportunists and Visa really missed the plot here, having such an incredible story to tell but failing to even scratch the surface, or to execute it the right way. Grey London, on the other hand, did UNHCR proud with this clip to celebrate the team’s participation to Rio.

I left my favourite for the end. There were lots of expectations on C4 after they’ve raised the bar quite high with their Superhumans clip 4 years ago. Well guess what, they’re back, moving from strength to unlimited ability (yes Nike, they can). Here’s a clip celebrating those who overcome their disability well beyond the Olympics stage. And don’t miss the short clips telling the stories and skills of the cast in the film. Hats off.

PS: Since I’ve skipped through most of the noise out there, feel free to check Adage and Campaign for a full list.

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how did lucozade already lost the rwc?

Keeping up with such an exciting Rugby World Cup, it would be wrong not to look at the aftermath of England’s dramatic early exit from the competition. We all know the consequences it will have for the country’s economy, the team’s sponsors and the nation’s moral state.

Lucozade thought they had a good idea when they activated the brand’s sponsorship of The Rose with a tongue in cheek effort that ended up with “for the home nation only” as a tagline.

Since then, Chris Robshaw and his mates have been ejected from their World Cup. Yet, that ad is still being smashed on pretty much every ad break. On top of the irony that the ad takes the piss out of the Aussies (who ended up giving a lesson to England), what is the relevance of the message now? Should the nation stop drinking Lucozade until the end of the RWC?

Why haven’t they planned for what happened on Saturday? Why didn’t they have a re-edit ready to go on air after the defeat? Or be flexible around their media plan? And why did they go for such a risky script to start with? So many questions that are rarely answered by brands in a similar situation…

The likes of Adidas and Nike are usually better prepared for such a scenario. After all they keep banging on with bold, inspirational slogans about glory and endorse teams and players all the time. For the 2002 Football World Cup, Adidas tried to hit big with a famous spot that pre-empted France’s success. After the team was knocked out during the group stage and without scoring a single goal, they released a different edit that felt like a natural sequel to the original one and looked forward to future glory. In a more recent example, the same Adidas invited key bloggers to watch the France team coach, that became infamous when the team decided to hold a strike against their management, being crushed to pieces to – once again – erase the past and look forward to future glory.

There is nothing wrong in crafting creative that relies on events you cannot control. That is as long as you are prepared with backup options when things happen.

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