Tag: Facebook

right place, right time.

What is Starbucks’ main success factor? Location, location, location.

I was reading one of Dave Trott’s articles on content and the fact that the real question wasn’t about how good it was, but rather how well it was distributed. Although I disagree that content can be anything (people don’t eat ****), I found the point on its delivery quite interesting.

After the year of content and the year of mobile, maybe it’s logical that everything is now about context. What made Amazon successful a few years back is now common practice. You’re much more likely to listen to suggestions if they are tailored to you and if you’re in the mindset of buying. I graduated with a dissertation on the potential of NFC and how supermarket shoppers could be prompted with a relevant promotion when walking past the relevant aisle. Or imagine McDonalds calling out drivers on the motorway with a contextual suggestion on Apple CarPlay?

After launching a partnership with Spotify, Uber has just unveiled an API for developers to create contextual content and services for their riders (think about Heineken telling you about some cool bars in the area you’re heading to). 4newswall made the news accessible and relevant to millennials, and was hosted on Tumblr. Even the latest iOS is now “learning” your habits to suggest actions based on the context you find yourself in.

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Most marketers are scared of the connected world’s ecosystem, not knowing where to start. That’s probably why most content is still buried within millions of YouTube videos and Facebook posts – the megaphones of social media. The truth is that the countless platforms available offer the richest opportunities in terms of audience and context.

So instead of creating content for the sake of it, start by learning your audience’s pathways. Only then you can reach them with relevant content that won’t necessarily hit billions of likes from some bots in India, but that will engage and move people to their very core. And that’s pretty much what true content should be about.

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learning from dicaprio’s near misses at cannes.

We’ve once won an industry award at my first agency. I remember the planner running around the office, brandishing a creative brief with a mandatory section that read: “this piece of work needs to win us an award”.

My proudest achievement to date – the Puma Dance Dictionary – won us some awards, but not before the international press talked about it. Not before I received a Puma Dance Dictionary message from a close friend I hadn’t talked to in years. If the purpose of what we do is to use brands to fuel culture and make something people will love, then there’s nothing more rewarding than having people talking about it. Unless you’re a multi-awards-winning CD, a Lion is really only destined to sit under some dust in reception or be buried under a lot of blurb in your CV.

Besides, what have awards become today? The backlash from the recent Cannes Lions was clear in pointing out that the strongest ideas had made place to what could be defined as “gimmicks”. Grey’s Grand Prix wins for Volvo and Facebook’s ice bucket challenge are good examples. And with new categories created every year, we are just devaluing what was the most respected awards show a decade ago.

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It is hard to argue against Leonardo DiCaprio’s performances over the time, yet he’s never left Cannes with anything else than a hangover. The year he failed to win an – expected – award for his performance on The Wolf of Wall Street, the Oscar went to Matthew McConaughey for his performance in Dallas Buyers Club (movie fanatics will remember that McConaughey undertook an extraordinary physical transformation for that film). Perhaps Oscars aren’t rewarding the best performances anymore. Perhaps that’s why Leonardo’s physical effort in The Revenant is likely to finally win him one. And perhaps there is a strong case for awards to be overrated.

Awards give you momentum, which could in turn win you clients and talent, but never should they come before or in the way of what we do in this Industry – culturally defining moments that get people to give a damn.

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