Strong brands. Powerful ideas. Disrupting culture and adding value to our lives.

Powerful ideas are not around the corner. They happen when talented people, and good brands, come together with the single goal to produce the greatest work of their lives in an attempt to affect culture. They get people to listen, give a damn and respond in a way that transcends the simple action of buying stuff. They trigger and nurture conversations. Sometimes they even change the World as we know it. MARKET/that shares a modest view on the good (and the not so good) that comes from it all.

/how did Lucozade already lost the RWC?

Keeping up with such an exciting Rugby World Cup, it would be wrong not to look at the aftermath of England’s dramatic early exit from the competition. We all know the consequences it will have for the country’s economy, the team’s sponsors and the nation’s moral state.

Lucozade thought they had a good idea when they activated the brand’s sponsorship of The Rose with a tongue in cheek effort that ended up with “for the home nation only” as a tagline.

Since then, Chris Robshaw and his mates have been ejected from their World Cup. Yet, that ad is still being smashed on pretty much every ad break. On top of the irony that the ad takes the piss out of the Aussies (who ended up giving a lesson to England), what is the relevance of the message now? Should the nation stop drinking Lucozade until the end of the RWC?

Why haven’t they planned for what happened on Saturday? Why didn’t they have a re-edit ready to go on air after the defeat? Or be flexible around their media plan? And why did they go for such a risky script to start with? So many questions that are rarely answered by brands in a similar situation…

The likes of Adidas and Nike are usually better prepared for such a scenario. After all they keep banging on with bold, inspirational slogans about glory and endorse teams and players all the time. For the 2002 Football World Cup, Adidas tried to hit big with a famous spot that pre-empted France’s success. After the team was knocked out during the group stage and without scoring a single goal, they released a different edit that felt like a natural sequel to the original one and looked forward to future glory. In a more recent example, the same Adidas invited key bloggers to watch the France team coach, that became infamous when the team decided to hold a strike against their management, being crushed to pieces to – once again – erase the past and look forward to future glory.

There is nothing wrong in crafting creative that relies on events you cannot control. That is as long as you are prepared with backup options when things happen.

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/celebrate the game.

3 days into the Rugby World Cup and it’s about time I shared some work from the many brands out there trying to own their share of the game.

I’ll start with one of my favourites from Beats. Following on from their Football WC success (“The game before the game”), they carried on with long form content centered around the theme of preparation and anticipation with 3 films celebrating the stories of France (Fofana), New Zealand (McCaw) and England (Robshaw). “The game starts here” (what an evolved copy) is complete with some more content online around the 3 stories. Once again, R/GA showed that they know how to put a good narrative together and truly move their audience.

For those who are just getting into the Rugby vibe, Grey London and The Times went for the educational approach, with the “A to Z of Rugby“, hosted by international legends such as Lawrence Dallaglio, Sean Fitzpatrick and Gareth Thomas in a series of films attempting to decypher the language of the game with a light-hearted execution.

And the third one will have to bring some good around us. Rugby creates an interesting opportunity for blood donations. Both the natutre of the sport and its philosophy, built around respect and fair play, make it the right playground for such a message. That’s what the NHS tapped into with a bold execution around the iconic Rose. And they even went beyond by involving the legends of the game and their real blood. Watch it here.

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One will note that every ad break is filled with football-related messages (mostly betting) that might upset the true Rugby lover out there.

And last but not least, we are yet to see a brand making the most of a moment like Oreo did at the 2013 Superbowl. What about the controversial use of the video to give and then cancel tries?

Much more to come from the likes of Guinness and Land Rover so keep an eye on it as you enjoy what I hope will be a thrilling RWC.


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/think small.

Celebrating one of the most powerful ideas ever from Volkswagen and DDB in style, courtesy of a great Art Director (Samuel Hanson), my modest copywriting skills and our superstar pug Epice.

And remember, think it over.


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/what’s your mantra?

In an Industry where everyone is relentlessly trying to stand out, my fellow admen will be aware that most agencies in town are using a mantra to differentiate themselves from their competition. So here we are, working on “Real World Communications“, for the “connected age“, with “brave ideas beautifully executed“. These mantras usually shout about an approach, a POV or a methodology. In most agencies they reflect a culture, something that will be applied to everything they do, right from their recruitment policy to the delivery of work.

But really, to what extent do they differentiate from one another? If everyone is trying to say something different then surely no one will end up breaking through that clutter of would-be punchy lines?

Let’s get this straight. Most of them are so obvious they are almost insulting to any sound marketer out there. Who would go to R/GA expecting work that isn’t “for the connected age“? Who would knock at AMV‘s door and wouldn’t expect them to “help solve business challenges with creative ideas that change the competitive landscape“?

Don’t get me wrong, some of them do matter and make you listen. They do when they connect an agency’s strategic approach with its vision. They do when they are remembered over time and have a true purpose. They are defined through the circle of truth. They answer why we do thing, why do consumers care about our work and why would a client want to partner with us.

Perhaps another approach would simply be not to have one and define yourself through what eventually matters the most. Your work. Something to think about.

And to wrap your week, here’s a nice little something challenging you to match a mantra to its agency.

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/by the way, how’s the Apple Watch doing?

This week was probably the most important one of the year for many early adopters out there (probably because Star Wars will only be out at the end of the year). Tim Cook – first disciple of Saint Steve – unveiled a whole bunch of new Apple gadgets, including a new iPhone, iPad, 3D Touch, and pencil (because “nobody wants a stylus”, right Steve?)

But what about the Watch, Tim? So far the Watch is slowly taking off with about 4M devices shipped. Good but still some way to go before they can replace something that’s been on our wrists for so long.

The recent announcement of an Hermes partnership (and a less “gadgety” look) is going to give it more credibility as a fashion accessory, a key step to reach before competing in the watch market (and not the smartwatch one). You could see the foundation of that strategy when they launched a high end Edition range. Let’s face it, no advertising will do more than showing off its features and how it could benefit our lives, but I doubt the millions of Apple users need convincing on that front. The real challenge to me is to convince people it can replace their watch – something that is everything BUT a gadget in most people’s minds.

One shouldn’t undermine how important that product line is to them. They are building on their new status of luxury brand (especially in Asia and according to Brandz) and will have to gain full credibility within the category.

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/the renaissance of Lego.

For a recent client meeting, we had to prepare by presenting our favourite brand. In the shadow of Apple and Coke, few would have chosen Lego. I remember spending hours mixing the content of Lego boxes collected Christmas after Christmas to build my own creations, just like, today, some commissioned artists amaze my eyes in the isles of our department stores. Lego might be one of the longest ideas ever created. They come back from nowhere and I have noticed 3 key factors to their success.

Staying true to themselves – the father and son story. In a time of recession, most brands have shifted their messages towards their heritage, going back to their brand’s roots, product classics or local heritage. Lego will forgive you for not knowing they are a Danish brand, as long as you remember their rectangle bricks, and the countless edifices you have been crafting and building with your dad. That story has even been the focus of their recent ad.

lego dad and sson

Innovating and diversifying – They went beyond their category to build a strong, all round brand. Not many toy brands count a theme park, a fashion range (that I surprisingly spotted in Copenhagen airport) and a blockbuster film to their name. From a product perspective, they’ve also diversified through new product lines to reach girls with the successful launch of Lego Friends.

Staying relevant by celebrating popular culture – the partnerships with strong equities such as Star Wars to even create a collector piece, once retailing at $500 (and probably more on e-Bay), the hype around the launch of a Simpsons range or the celebration of Breaking Bad. They have followed a strategy of brand association, which could prove successful (Angry Bird with Rio and Star Wars edition) or disastrous (Cover Girl Hunger Games edition). Not only did they broaden their audience, from fathers and sons to nerds saving to buy their collectors, but they have also managed to respond to a growing competition in the bricks building market by keeping their name at the top of consumers’ mind. To the point that porn star Christy Mack chose Lego when challenging her audience for an interesting reward (mind you, I’m not interested). Or even Cern’s competition by hiding Legos in Google Street View. Speaking about nerds, what about some new ideas for your Halloween costumes?

Lego came from nowhere indeed but – having experienced with innovation – they managed to find the right balance between keeping their heritage and embracing the Now. And that’s just clever marketing. The challenge will be to remain focused and not overwhelmed by spreading around with no clear direction or brand vision. But we shouldn’t worry too much about that since they probably learnt from their past mistakes.

lego man

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/is Apple getting tired?

Apple’s slick product development strategy consists of permanently avoiding the maturity phase of its products by spreading the deployment of their existing innovations over time. This ensures consumers will keep upgrading their devices and flourish the company’s cash flow with minimum R&D. Perhaps what they didn’t realise is that this strategy is, today, leading the company itself to its maturity phase, as they are seen as lacking innovation as a whole.

Is Apple getting tired? The fact that this happened when Steve Jobs left the Earth is a mere coincidence to me. This trend had already started before he left. Maybe the answer simply relies in the fact that competition managed to catch up. Apple’s current trial with Samsung – the company behind the development of the iPhone’s nemesis – unveiled an interesting letter that says it all about Samsung’s threat on Apple.


These two companies are differentiated by a key aspect of their marketing. Samsung never really had a strong brand equity, nor vision. If they have one, it is nowhere near the one of Apple (I wouldn’t wear a Samsung T-shirt – would you?). But they embraced Android like no other and managed to create a simple yet innovative and powerful product line in the name of the Galaxy range, which has quickly matched the appeal of the iPhone. Apple on the other hand, have established one of the strongest brands ever and have been challenging the status quo since releasing the first Mac with an ad to remember in 1984. That said, the recent releases of their products have been disappointing to say the least, with some little evolution that has been beaten by Samsung and other players in the market. A focus on a strong brand vs. a focus on a strong product.

What did go wrong for a company that was seen untouchable 5 years ago? Any new technologies they proudly launched have been matched by the competition, be it Siri or Face Time. They released a new iOS, which, to me, seems to take some hints from both Windows Mobile (design) and Android (functionality). Just like they seem to align on their competitors, with the rumoured launch of a bigger screen size after resisting it with the argument that you could reach the whole of your iPhone 5 screen with your thumb. And their anticipated attempt to release a cheaper version of the iPhone – the iPhone 5c, which is basically the iPhone 5 with a plastic colour cover reminiscent of the relaunch of the iPod Nano range – failed to deliver with a hefty price of around £450.


Maybe that last point is the beginning of the answer. When Apple released what everyone expected as an entry-level iPhone, they were actually never going to trade off their premiumness which is what their brand stands for and simply released a colour range rather than compromising on who they are. Can focusing on their brand keep them out of the water for long? The launch of the iPhone 6 at the end of this year is still fuelling conversations and will definitely be a turning point should they fail to deliver ground-breaking innovation. Their activeness on the patent front might be reassuring. There are also new battlefields this year, such as the wearable tech, with Google and Samsung being key players. So let’s not list them as dead just yet. After all, maybe that mind-blowing ad (and the way it was launched at the back of the Super Bowl storm) is reminding everyone of who they are. The question, though, is not about who they are but about what they will do.


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/the dominos effect.

When was the last time you flew low cost on a short haul trip? My flatmate is addicted to it and it doesn’t take a PhD in sciences to understand why. Firstly, it is 2 to 4 times cheaper than flying on a major airline. Secondly, what would you get by paying more on a major anyway? I mean what did major airlines become today? The last short haul flights I took on BA were no better than flying on EasyJet if it wasn’t for being assigned a seat, having relatively better looking stewardesses and a complimentary – yet disgusting – snack with my free soda. Yet I can remember flying on major airlines 10 years ago and it wasn’t like that. So what happened in between? Low cost airlines happened.

With a clever business model based on “no frills”, they became massively price-competitive against major airlines. One of their strengths was to target remote airports and cities that were ready to cut their costs down and to subvention the carriers on the basis that they were bringing a new flow of tourists in these areas. They’ve impacted their Industry and beyond. Firstly, they managed to open some new routes to tourists who could not have afforded it otherwise, which brought a lot of business to those targeted cities. You would therefore be right to see a positive side effect in low cost airlines but Majorca city doesn’t really see it this way, claiming that low cost travel actually brought a new type of tourists – and one from the lower economic tier of the population. Put it this way, budget airlines offered the poor the chance to fly like the rich and enjoy the same vacations, which resulted in the rich leaving to pastures new, and therefore not really benefiting these cities from that economic growth I was mentioning earlier. Another side effect is what budget travel did to major airlines, threatening their business, resulting in the latter finding ways to compete and also trending towards the no frills business model. Finally a – so-called – negative side effect of budget airlines is their impact on the environment. More flights mean more gas emissions that aren’t good for Mother Nature. “So-called” because aviation is only responsible for around 2% of all gaz emissions and that beef eaters (cows being responsible for 20% of these same emissions) should think twice before pointing to the sky.

brit holidays

These side effects, whether they are desired/ controlled or not, have a name: externalities. 

A side effect or consequence of an industrial or commercial activity that affects other parties without this being reflected in the cost of the goods or services involved.

A good example is the LoJack as well spotted by Levitt and Dubner in Super Freakonomics. LoJack is a security device that can be hidden into a car and that will track that car – when stolen – via GPS whilst alerting the police. Very efficient but its prohibitive cost of $700 means there are only a few being used. Now, since a car thief can’t tell the difference between a car with and without a LoJack, he might think twice before stealing ANY car. This shows the very positive externality your rich neighbour had on the whole neighbourhood.

Now even though most externalities aren’t controlled, one can benefit from looking at the bigger picture when action on the market. Economist Keynes established a theory in which the government should be highly present in the economy of a country to ensure its growth. In a nutshell, he said that if the government, say, would decrease interest rates, and build good infrastructures to a city, then foreign investment would come, creating new businesses, diminishing unemployment, decreasing poverty and crime and so on. The virtuous circle. Most governments today are tackling unemployment by spending money on companies that are reluctant to hire, and job centres. Is this really the best solution? You can’t force a company to hire more people if there is no business growth to justify it. So why not spending money on that growth? Why not following Keynes’ theory? Externalities proved us that you can be more effective by looking beyond what the problem is. The dominos effect.


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/the common point between the iPhone 4 and a bottle of Coke.

I have spent 3 years on Nokia’s global communications. One of the interesting things you learn while working on global campaigns is the differences in shopper behaviours across markets. For example, research has shown that in most developed markets shoppers purchase their mobile phones on a contract, therefore trust the operator or phone specialists to sell them the device, usually at a much lower cost and alongside an engagement over time. The operator therefore plays the role of sole trusted distributor on the market, which allows him to dictate most rules such as the format of the end product (adding in their branding on both soft and hardware), price promotions or even back margins. Now why would this matter?

When Nokia’s ex-CEO (may he rest in peace) announced in 2009 that his company would now focus on selling mobile solutions (i.e. devices and services) as opposed to manufactured products (i.e. device only), this only highlighted an established trend that eventually allowed more players to enter the market (since developing a software is relatively cheaper and less painful than prototyping a new hardware). That is in that context that operators such as Orange or O2 started to launch their own mobile services and to preload it on the devices they were selling, sidelining the manufacturers’ offering.


The power to dictate the rules has switched from the manufacturer to the operator, in a context where both of them are trying to sell mobile services that have the same consumer benefits. So why do we persist on doubling up? How does Nokia justify its Ovi Music marketing budget in the UK, where Orange (one of its main distributors) will sell Nokia devices with Orange Monkey? Why don’t the 2 players work hand in hand to develop common platforms that would be even more compelling and less confusing for consumers?

Mind you, these assumptions aren’t a rule of thumb. A great software such as the successful Ovi Maps proved that the manufacturer can overturn the market’s standards and allow consumers to download the service they wish to use. Another exception is the Apple iPhone that managed to rely on strong brand equity to reverse the trend and dictate its rules to operators (exclusive/ selective distribution, exclusive use of Apple services, share of revenues etc…).

An acclaimed brand gives it the right to switch the balance of power between suppliers and distributors. This is not new at all. After all, Apple only did exactly what Coke did to all its grocery retailers (ever considered a grocery store without bottles of Coke?). There again, it’s not the product or the service, it’s the brand and the way you sell it.

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